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Posts tagged as “chinese communist party”

2047 is Now. What is the Future of Hong Kong?

We haven’t posted anything for a couple of days on this site. It seemed nothing more could be said about the brutality of Hong Kong’s police, but no other news seems worth writing about in comparison.

By now, pretty much everyone that has been paying attention at all knows about the police siege of Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Hundreds of students are trapped there. The police won’t let them leave unless they “surrender,” which would almost certainly mean being subjected to torture and abuse. Naturally, the students don’t want to surrender, for that reason, and also because they believe they are fighting for their home, their freedom, and their rights. They deserve and need the entire free world’s support.

In 2047, the “one country, two systems” agreement that was negotiated between the U.K. and the Chinese government at the handover in 1997 officially ends, and Hong Kong becomes completely subject to the arbitrary legal system of mainland China, where there is no rule of law, lawyers are regularly arrested and detained, the rights of citizens are non-existent, and people accused of “crimes” are disappeared into black jails, with no contact with lawyers or family.

But today, it is clear that it is already 2047 in Hong Kong.

In the past couple of days, Hong Kong’s highest court ruled that Carrie Lam’s ban on face masks is unconstitutional, violating the Basic Law.

Today, the CCP said that Hong Kong’s courts cannot rule on the constitutionality of legislation passed by the Hong Kong government. Only the CCP can. Read this important thread: https://twitter.com/stuartlauscmp/status/1196565359026999296

[China’s] constitution and the Basic Law jointly form the constitutional foundation of [HK]. Whether HK’s legislation is consistent with the HK Basic Law can only judged and decided by the National People’s Congress standing committee. No other parties can judge or decide.”

CCP National People’s Congress overrules Hong Kong’s High Court

If Hong Kong’s courts cannot decide what Kong Kong’s laws mean and whether or not they are in accordance with Hong Kong’s constitution (the Basic Law), then there is no reason for them to exist. There is no longer any rule of law in Hong Kong.

There is also now evidence that authorities are transporting arrested pro-democracy demonstrators out of Hong Kong. Carrie Lam may have withdrawn the extradition bill that started the demonstrations, but everyone knows that the CCP will do whatever it wants, regardless of what any law says.

If this is actually happening now in Hong Kong, it’s a scene that reminds us of the worst atrocities visited on people in all of human history. It is terrifying. Given what we know is happening in Xinjiang to the Uyghurs, it is certainly possible that these young people will disappear into China’s gulag, where they will have no rights at all. Pray that they will be released soon, unharmed.

It is already 2047 in Hong Kong.

You Can’t Argue About the Law in Here! This is a Courtroom!

One of the primary reasons that China cannot be trusted as a business or trade partner, and also one of the primary reasons that it is one of the world’s foremost violators of human rights, is because China does not have a free, fair, and independent legal system. There is no effective rule of law in China; rather, legal decisions are based on what CCP bosses or other influential people want them to be. Judges are entirely beholden to the CCP, and often do not have any legal training whatsoever. On top of that, the Chinese reliance on guan xi (关系) – a term that is hard to translate, but roughly means relationships, connections, and influence – for solving problems and decision making makes the legal system incredibly corrupt. Declarations of guilt or innocence, who is right or wrong in contract negotiations, and so on, depend as much or more on guan xi as they do on what the law actually says or on the facts and evidence at hand.

To be sure, China does have laws, and when non-Chinese read the laws (translated), they often even sound good and right. The problem is that the laws are not fairly or evenly enforced, not just because of the guan xi issue we described above, but also because lawyers are themselves often charged with crimes for advocating for their clients!

Read this heartbreaking story from the Hong Kong Free Press.

Stories like this are all too common in China. Lawyers who advocate for their clients’ rights are often arrested and disappeared – held incommunicado for months or years, with no contact with their families or their own lawyers.

[Lawyer] Yu [Wensheng] was detained in Beijing in January 2018 in front of his young son after he wrote an open letter calling for constitutional reforms, including multi-candidate elections.
He was later charged with “inciting subversion of state power”.

Hong Kong Free Press article

Human rights lawyers are especially targeted by the CCP, as was the case here, and charged with nonsense crimes like “inciting subversion of state power” or “subverting public order” – the usual kind of things that fascist dictatorships make up to give legal cover to their oppression and abuse. However, lawyers in other kinds of cases, like contract disputes between Chinese companies and western companies, have also been targeted, if they happen to argue too effectively or vociferously for their foreign client’s rights and interests. Western companies doing business in China should not expect to be treated fairly or in accordance with the law if they happen to get into a dispute with a Chinese company.

This is all part and parcel of the CCP’s oppression of human rights in China. It is why the people of Hong Kong are so vehemently opposed to the (now withdrawn) extradition bill that would allow Hong Kong citizens to be extradited to mainland China for “trial.” The CCP simply cannot be trusted – for many reasons, not least of which is that there is no rule of law in China. China’s abominable treatment of lawyers is one more proof of that.

TAIPEI Act Passes Senate and House Committee

Today, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the TAIPEI Act, a bill that is intended to encourage countries to maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan and to punish with U.S. sanctions countries that break ties with Taiwan in favor of mainland China. The House version of the bill also passed unanimously in the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee.

As reported by Taiwan News, members of the House spoke in favor of formal recognition of Taiwan as an independent country.

Of course, if Taiwan should declare full independence and the U.S. recognizes Taiwan as independent, the CCP will blow a gasket.

Our attitude is that if the CCP vehemently opposes something, it is almost certainly the right thing to do. We encourage the House to quickly pass the TAIPEI act and for President Trump to sign the bill into law.

Beyond that, it’s a fact that the People’s Republic of China and the CCP have never controlled Taiwan, and the CCP’s claims on Taiwan are completely illegitimate. Taiwan is a de facto independent country, and should be recognized as such.

Nevertheless, the CCP’s military threats against Taiwan cannot be ignored. Xi Jinping has said that if Taiwan declares itself an independent country, the CCP will take military action, invading Taiwan to forcibly integrate it into the People’s Republic of China. (Ironically, to claim independence, Taiwan – the Republic of China -would have to give up its historical claims as the legitimate government of the Chinese mainland). So, before declaring independence, Taiwan would need formal defense treaties with the U.S. and neighboring countries. It is unlikely that will happen any time soon, so for now, supporting Taiwan through arms sales, consultation, diplomatic measures (like the TAIPEI Act) and so on is the most likely – and probably the correct – path forward for the time being.

Taiwan is an example of what mainland China could be – a free and open democratic nation where the rights and opinions of its citizens are protected and respected. Its peaceful transition from a dictatorial regime under the Kuomintang to a true democracy is an inspiration to the world.

Men and Women in Black

Anyone that has been following the pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong knows that the demonstrators often wear black clothes as part of their unofficial uniform. The Hong Kong police know it too, and often target people wearing black clothes for beatings, pepper spray, and arrest – whether those people are actually taking part in a demonstration or not. Undercover police also wear black to blend in with the demonstrators.

So, after Carrie Lam’s ridiculous ban on masks had no effect whatsoever on reducing the number of demonstrators nor on reducing violence during the demonstrations (not surprising at all, since at least some of the violence is instigated by those same undercover police), the CCP has taken another step to oppress the people of Hong Kong in a way that will no doubt severely impact the pro-democracy movement – they’ve banned export of black clothes from China to Hong Kong!

By taking this extreme measure, the CCP thinks they will no doubt shut down – or at least very nearly shut down – the pro-democracy movement. But here at China Daily News, we’ve heard from reliable sources (ok, really no sources at all) that the pro-democracy demonstrators will retaliate by switching their black gear for this:

Image result for tie-dyed shirt democracy

Hah! Take that, CCP! What color are you going to ban next? All of them?

[Yes, this post is intended to be sarcastic, in case it wasn’t clear.]

Hong Kong Police Infiltrated by Mainland People’s Armed Police?

We have speculated here on China Daily News, as have many others, that the Hong Kong police have been infiltrated by People’s Armed Police from the mainland, and perhaps are being directly run by the People’s Armed Police now. It is possible that some regular Hong Kong police have been supplanted by People’s Armed Police officers and agents. The Hong Kong police leadership could be serving just as figureheads, with real control exercised by People’s Armed Police (the CCP, essentially) from behind the scenes.

It hasn’t made much sense that one of the most respected police forces in Asia would suddenly become out-of-control, brutal thugs completely disregarding the law and the rights of the Hong Kong people. Infiltration by People’s Armed Police would explain that.

In press conferences, the Hong Kong police leadership has denied that mainland People’s Armed Police or People’s Liberation Army units are embedded in the Hong Kong police force.

Today, however, more evidence has come to light that there are, in fact, mainland police in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong people usually speak Cantonese, a language spoken widely in southern China, including in Hong Kong. Mandarin is spoken in mainland China, and originates in northern China. They do not sound the same. This writer has studied Mandarin for over ten years, and it is pretty clear that the police in this video are speaking Mandarin. Native Mandarin and Cantonese speakers viewing the video have said the same.

What is actually happening in Hong Kong? Hong Kong police are also infiltrating the pro-democracy movement, and have admitted doing so, to arrest “extremely violent protesters.” There is clear evidence of it happening, like this Hong Kong police identity card dropped by a “protester.”

So how much of the violence and vandalism has actually been committed by CCP infiltrators and agitators posing as members of the pro-democracy movement in order to blame the demonstrators and turn public opinion away from them? At this point, who can say? Infiltration and espionage have long been a favored tactic of communists, going back to the earliest days of the CCP in its fight against the Nationalists.

The CCP’s pet media lapdogs, China Daily, Xinhua News, CCTV, Global Daily, etc. incessantly call the pro-democracy demonstrators, “rioters,” and show lurid images of violence and vandalism supposedly committed by them. But given that we know that the demonstrations have been infiltrated by the Hong Kong police, and the Hong Kong police have been infiltrated – or even taken over – by the CCP-controlled People’s Armed Police, is there really any doubt that CCP agents provocateur have also infiltrated the demonstrations? Who is really behind the violence and vandalism?

Full House in Shanghai for NBA Pre-Season Game

Well, this has got to be a little embarrassing for the CCP…

On the other hand, we all know that the CCP is incapable of feeling shame, so maybe not.

In any case, all the fire and brimstone cast down on the NBA and other companies by the CCP, as usual, is just a lot of hot air. The actions of Chinese people tell the real story. The CCP can bluster and bully all they want, but they don’t represent the majority of the Chinese people. Only around 6.5% of the Chinese people are CCP members. The CCP has an outsized voice, because it controls the Chinese media, but U.S. and international companies doing business in China need to realize that if a product is popular there, the Chinese people will get it, one way or another. Companies don’t have to, and should not, kowtow to the CCP’s demands. Have moral courage and be smart.

The Love of Money

Have you heard the phrase “the love of money is the root of all sorts of evil?” That phrase comes from the book of 1st Timothy in the Bible. Whether or not you believe the Bible, the wisdom in that verse and the preceding verse are undeniable.

People who want to get rich fall into temptation and a trap and into many foolish and harmful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.

1st Timothy 6:9,10a New International Version

We are seeing the reality of that all over the world right now. Several companies, from Apple to Blizzard Entertainment to the NBA to Google to Vans, have kowtowed to the CCP in order to continue stay in the good graces of the brutal, totalitarian Chinese Communist Party, so that they can continue to sell products and services in China.

We are reminded of another verse full of wisdom:

What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul?

Matthew 16:26 New International Version

There is nothing wrong with making money and being successful through honest hard work, risk taking, smart investing, and so on. Money is not evil, per se. But the love of moneygreed – is evil, because leads to bad decisions and moral compromises that endanger not only the greedy person or organization, but also the many, many other people affected by those bad decisions and moral compromises made for the love of money.

Selling out to the evils of the Chinese Communist Party, being willfully blind to the horrors it has perpetrated on humanity, are a prime example of this. Not only is it wrong morally, but in the long run, it is bad business. By at first kowtowing to the CCP, then backtracking and saying they support free speech, the NBA has alienated both their Chinese fan base, and their U.S. and international fan base. The same kind of thing is happening to other U.S. companies that kowtow to the CCP’s bullying. There is a price to be paid for being complicit in clear evil.

The NBA has said that they support free speech, and we respect that. Still, fans are being removed from pre-season games for showing support for Hong Kong and the Hong Kong people’s fight for freedom and human rights.

Let’s hope that the NBA and all American companies realize that they must not give in to greed and stand up against evil and for good. It is the moral and smart thing to do.

A Day of Mourning

Yesterday, of course, was the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. In Beijing, the CCP held a huge military parade, complete with goose-stepping soldiers and military hardware, to celebrate its “achievements,” as totalitarian states often do.

Meanwhile, pro-democracy demonstrators held peaceful marches and protests throughout Hong Kong, that later (as everyone knew would happen) turned violent. For the first time since the demonstrations started around four months ago, the Hong Kong police shot a protester with a potentially lethal bullet (not a beanbag round or rubber bullet). The victim of the shooting was just 18 years old, still a high school student.

The failures of the CCP, the Hong Kong government, and the Hong Kong police in handling this entire series of events, starting with the introduction of the extradition bill several months ago up until today with the potentially fatal shooting of a young high school student, cannot be overstated. They are arrogant, ignorant, stupid, lack creativity, and refuse to admit mistakes or take responsibility. On a day that anyone with any sense knew was going to tense and probably violent, Carrie Lam jetted off to Beijing to take part in the 70th anniversary celebrations there – just further cementing in everyone’s minds that she is totally a puppet of Xi Jinping and highlighting how uncaring and completely out of touch with the situation she is. Over and over again – including today after the shooting of the young student – the Hong Kong police have refused to ever admit mistakes or to any brutality whatsoever. Over and over again, their mistakes and brutality have been documented on video and by eyewitness accounts. But when confronted with this clear evidence, they shamelessly deny any wrongdoing and shamelessly lie in front of the journalists’ cameras for the entire world to see. The CCP and Hong Kong government have no answers, other than to ratchet up the violence day after day, trying to intimidate the population of Hong Kong into subservience to the CCP’s oppressive, totalitarian regime. It isn’t working.

The founding of the fascist CCP regime responsible for more deaths than any other in the history of the human race is nothing to celebrate. But the oppression and violence of the CCP isn’t just a matter of history (as they want you to believe), it is constant and pervasive, happening today in the South China Sea, where China bullies its neighbors over rights to resources and expands its military presence; in Tibet where the unique Tibetan culture is being demolished; in Xinjiang province, where the Uyghur people are being forced into concentration camps for re-education and worse; in Hong Kong, where brave freedom fighters are facing down the might of the CCP; and in mainland China, where most people do their best to stay out of the CCP’s way so they don’t get “invited to tea” with the police.

No, the anniversary of the subjugation of China by the Chinese Communist Party is a day of mourning for the world. Once again, the Chinese people deserve a much better government than the one they unfortunately have.

End of the Chinese Communist Party is Near?

The South China Morning Post has published an opinion piece by Minxin Pei arguing the we are seeing the “beginning of the end” of one-party rule in China.

Pei argues that, historically speaking, dictatorships typically last at most from 70 to 75 years. This has been true of dictatorships in Mexico, Taiwan (the KMT ruled autocratically from 1927 to 1949 on the mainland and from 1949 to 2000 in Taiwan), and the Soviet Union. The Kim family has ruled in North Korea for 71 years. Are there counter examples? The article doesn’t cite any, but many of the Chinese imperial dynasties lasted much, much longer than 75 years. Is the CCP more like dictatorships in other countries, or more like a Chinese imperial dynasty?

Pei makes other arguments based on politics, economics, military challenges, diplomacy, and domestic policy. Let’s discuss some of those issues.

Economically, China is facing challenges. The trade war with the U.S. is hurting China’s economy, despite the blustering denials coming from the CCP’s pet media outlets. From a military standpoint, even though China has been enlarging and modernizing its military, it is still far behind the U.S. military’s capabilities. Diplomatically, China’s “belt and road” initiatives and dollar diplomacy have made some headway, but China is still very much distrusted, and has few, if any, friends of consequence in the western Pacific. Japan, Korean, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, and Taiwan all have contentious, if not actually hostile, relationships with China. Russia has a sometimes-friendly, sometimes-not relationship with China. At this moment, China and Russia seem to be cooperating, but that could change at any time, should the relationship sour.

Domestically, the CCP has sold itself by touting the improving standard of living. Millions of Chinese have been lifted out of poverty, there is no doubt about that. But coming from the abject state that the Chinese people lived in prior to the 1980’s, achieving that only required economic policies that weren’t completely disastrous. Much of the miraculous growth in the Chinese economy was achieved through capital investment coming from Western countries, Japan, and Taiwan. That growth has slowed, and capital from developed countries is moving into countries with cheaper labor (and better legal protections, in some cases). If the Chinese economy drops into recession, on what will the CCP base its claim to rule legitimately? It is stoking nationalism as one means, but sustained nationalism requires sustained national achievement and true pride in one’s country. With the CCP so disrespected in the world, it is hard to imagine that the Chinese people can truly believe in its legitimacy over the long term.

Dictatorships and one-party states face inherent internal contradictions. Every government, as an organization run by imperfect people, is imperfect and makes mistakes. Public and world opinion changes, natural disasters occur, new ideas arise, countries go to war, and so on. Things happen.

True democratic societies have a built-in mechanism – periodic elections – to make policy changes in response to changes in society and the world. Sometimes they are slow to respond, but they can respond in a deliberate way that reflects the will of the majority of the people (hopefully, as in the U.S., while respecting the rights of people that disagree). In essence, elections are “mini-revolutions” that allow for political challenges to be addressed through peaceful change.

Dictatorships and one-party states do not have this mechanism, so internal stresses build up that eventually lead to their downfall. They are “brittle.” They often respond to challenges either wildly or not at all. They become corrupt, as their legal systems are not fair and are bound to the policy of the one-party state; thus, they lack legitimacy. State-run economic systems cannot respond quickly to changes in markets, and so are inefficient. Historically in China, the process of a dynasty becoming weak and corrupt, unable to respond effectively to internal and external challenges, is known as “losing the mandate of heaven,” and it has always led to the downfall of the imperial dynasty, and eventual replacement by another. Is the CCP losing the “mandate of heaven?”

The modern, high-tech police state implemented in China, with ubiquitous surveillance, “social credit” scores for every person, and so on, maybe will allow the CCP to maintain its power through more efficient oppression of the Chinese people, but how long can that last? At what point do the Chinese people, with the greater access to information now than in the past, look at the rights that citizens of other countries enjoy, and say, “what about us?” Dictatorships and one-party states, like the Soviet Union, often have collapsed (as the famous quote says) “slowly, then all at once.” Will the CCP collapse in the same way?

Periods between dynasties in China have often been times of horrifying bloodshed and civil war. No one wants that in China. Could the CCP transition peacefully, allowing free elections and truly independent opposition political parties, as happened in Taiwan? That would be the best-case scenario, but it doesn’t seem likely, especially as long as Xi Jinping rules the CCP and mainland China autocratically. Could the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong spark a pro-democracy movement in the mainland? The CCP clearly is very, very afraid of that happening, but right now, that doesn’t seem likely either. In this writer’s view, the CCP is firmly in power in mainland China and will remain so, despite the challenges it faces. It may be the beginning of the end for the CCP, but sadly, the end is still far in the future.

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